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Energy BrainBlog

Blog by Energy Brainpool GmbH & Co. KG

Tag: Energy Economy (page 1 of 18)

Energy Market Review September 2019: Climate package, Wind power summit and the Innogy-takeover

The wind power summit at the beginning of September 2019 ended without concrete measures. However, the Federal Government’s eagerly awaited climate package disappoints with its timidity in terms of climate and energy policy. Furthermore, the takeover plans of Innogy by energy company E.ON are on track. France’s nuclears and oil caused commodity prices to rise and fall.


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EU Energy Outlook 2050 – how will Europe evolve over the next 30 years?

With the current “EU Energy Outlook 2050” Energy Brainpool shows long-term trends in Europe. Climate change and aging power plants are forcing the European Union and many countries to change their energy policies. In addition, there are market changes. What do these developments mean for electricity prices, revenue potential and risks for photovoltaics and wind?


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The energy market review July 2019: returns on grid infrastructure and CO2 pricing

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© Energy Brainpool

The German Federal Court of Justice confirmed lower returns for grid operators, while renewable energies were on record course in the first half of 2019. Associations and politicians discuss the various possibilities for CO2 pricing. There was also a strong upward trend on the prices side in July 2019.


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What does the BP Stats Review 2019 say about the global hunger for energy?

While renewables were the largest source of new electricity generation on a global level, rising use of gas, oil and coal led to CO2-emissions being two percent higher in 2018 than in 2017. The disquieting truth about the global energy system: growing energy hunger outpaces renewable expansion. The increasing demand of 2.8 percent was primarily met by fossil fuels. This process puts climate goals to risk with the fastest growth of carbon emission in seven years.


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Germany’s CO2-emissions fell by 4.5 percent in 2018

The latest figures from the Federal Environment Agency make it official. Germany emitted 4.5 percent less CO2 last year. Emissions were thus just over 865 million tonnes. The energy sector and households accounted for the lion’s share of the decline. In this article you will find a summary of Germany’s CO2 balance for the year 2018.


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The energy market review June 2019: Hot phase or hot air?

While the tender for PV delivered lower prices in June 2019, there will be delays on the climate policy front. The details of a possible CO2-pricing and a climate-based tax reform are not to be announced until autumn. On the other hand, the second progress report on the energy transition makes it clear that many of the energy transition targets will not be achieved at the current rate of developments. While the spot market turned negative for several hours, the prices at the long end are falling with coal and gas.


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Energy market review May 2019: Wind auction flops, discussion about CO2 pricing and the consequences of coal phase-out

While the wind auction in May 2019 was heavily undersubscribed, the discussion about additional CO2 pricing is entering a hot phase. In particular, the need for measures to increase the use of renewable energies and reduce greenhouse gas emissions make this clear. On the price side, May 2019 was less decisive and, after initial gains, did not provide any long-term impetus.


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Energy market review April 2019: CO2-limits in transport, rising bid values and negative prices at Easter

Energy Brainpool
© Energy Brainpool

The bid values increased in the first tenders in Germany for renewable energies in 2019. In contrast, CO2-limits for new cars and trucks are intended to reduce the emissions of the EU. New German power lines and power-to-gas plants should be easier to set up and plan. On the price side, the trend in April 2019 was mainly upwards. The exception: Easter holidays brought many negative prices.


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